Chinatown (1974)

The Chinatown is a movie about many things. But above all it’s a really good crime movie that has all the suspense and thrills of a noir film. In Chinatown Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) is a private investigator who used to work for the district attorney in Chinatown. He has left the job for untold reasons but one can speculate that he left unwillingly. Gittes is hired by a woman claiming to be a wife of Hollis Mulwray, the head of department of water and power. What Gittes didn’t know is that the woman is a fake and he will find himself in the middle of a complicated murder investigation. The director Roman Polanski does amazing job of putting this complicated scenario into a two hour feature film and the Chinatown is a work of a masterpiece. Jack Nicholson and the rest of the cast also does excellent job of portraying each characters. This film was created during the height of New Hollywood era and has the characteristics of New Hollywood films. The breakthrough film technology has allowed Polanski for location shooting and he was able to capture and bring the realism into the theatre. Violent and sexual scenes were also included in the film. Gittes is also an anti-hero and he is unlike the heroes that were usually portrayed. The shock-ending also adds to the setting. Overall, this movie was an excellent crime movie that depicts dark world and anybody who can appreciate a good film should watch and enjoy it.  

Work Cited

Dixon, W, & Foster, G. (2009). A short history of film. NJ: Rutgers University Press.

http://www.awardsdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/chinatown_jack_nicholson.jpg. (n.d.).

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2 Responses to Chinatown (1974)

  1. rosemarie says:

    Gotta love vintage Jack Nicholson

  2. Juan Monroy says:

    I’m not sure technology played a big role in Chinatown, but Polanski’s freshness and well-studied approach to filmmaking did play a big role in reviving this long-dormant genre.

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