Film Response – Dog Day Afternoon

 

Max Gazzara         

   Dog Day Afternoon

    The New Hollywood film that I chose to watch was Dog Day Afternoon. Al Pacino does an amazing job in this riveting and entertaining movie. New Hollywood films were prevalent throughout the whole 1970s, with some films in the late 1960s and early 1980s as well.  Dog Day Afternoon came out in the year 1972, and is about two bank robbers who get caught by the police and hold a group of women hostage throughout the process. The main character, Sonny, along with his partner Sal attempt the robbery in order to allow Sal’s male lover to go under a sex change operation. 

   The two hour and ten minute film keeps viewers on their toes as they wait to see what will unravel next. New Hollywood films arose after the fall of the MPPDA (which banned movie goers from seeing nudity, bad language, etc.) In Dog Day Afternoon, it is obvious that times have changed since the early 1900’s due to all of the cursing and some violence that can be found in the film. Without the MPPDA seal of approval, the New Hollywood films were able to do as they pleased. New Hollywood films also reached out to the youth, and it can be seen that Dog Day Afternoon would draw a younger crowd due to the excitement and stars in the film.

    Overall, I found the suspenseful movie very entertaining and at the same time sad. Both men have a negative fate and fail to see what they set out to do. I would recommend this movie to others to enjoy as well.
           

Works Cited
Leydon, Joe. “Old Hollywood ON THE New Hollywood.” MovieMaker 12.59 (2005): 102-104. Film & Television Literature Index. EBSCO. Web. 22 Feb. 2011. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=fah&AN=17712350&site=ehost-live

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2 Responses to Film Response – Dog Day Afternoon

  1. Juan Monroy says:

    Good. Can you elaborate on why the film was so gruesome that it warranted being outside of the MPAA system, as you write? I don’t think I follow.

  2. max219 says:

    I feel that the film was gruesome in the sense of the foul language used throughout the entire film. Also, the final scene where Sal gets shot in the head is quite violent as well.

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